Some interesting metal working tools

rtj

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An FYI, you may already be aware of this option. In the past when I needed metal stock, I went straight to McMaster. But, since I’m a prime member (free shipping), I started checking Amazon first. Especially, on short pieces, they can be way less.

Also, got the best tractor tire price for smaller tires.
 

rtj

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This might be a good starter kit for an over frame side pipe header (versus paying $4k).

Long Tube BBC Side Exit Header Kit (14° Head) 2.250 - 2.375 Tube Size



https://www.dynatechheaders.com/store.aspx?itemid=3462&prodid=17608&pagetitle=Long-Tube-BBC-Side-Exit-Header-Kit-(14°-Head)--2.250----2.375--Tube-Size


These Long Tube Big Block Chevy Header kits are designed with ease of assembly and performance in mind. The tubes are tack welded together to make it easy to completely assemble or make changes. Collectors are sold separately and come in a variety of sizes in standard or merge style configurations. Optional ceramic coating is available once you assemble your kit. After assembly, the 16 gauge steel construction and CNC laser-cut, surfaced flanges make this a durable header for multiple racing seasons.

  • 0.375" thick CNC laser cut and surfaced flanges.
  • Stepped tube sizes to optimize torque and horsepower.
  • Designed to run out the side fender of a tube chassis door car with a BBC.
  • 28.000" primaries.
 

BBShark

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About a minute or two into it, the tube is in a cutoff saw. The cutoff saw is a reciprocating saw (not a band saw). Never seen one. Maybe that is what is used for heavy stock.
 

rtj

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Yes, the ones I have seen, have large “hacksaw” style blades. :)

I thought it was pretty cool how he made those.
 

SuperBuickGuy

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About a minute or two into it, the tube is in a cutoff saw. The cutoff saw is a reciprocating saw (not a band saw). Never seen one. Maybe that is what is used for heavy stock.
Powered hacksaws are rarely used because they eat blades. When everyone started going to bandsaws, those machines were really, really cheap to buy. You can still buy 'rebuilders' and even new. The problem is they get warm and that dulls the blade, once the blade gets dull it just creates a lot of heat.
 

BBShark

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Yeah, the machine looked like an antique and I'm sure its tough on blades (using a small part of the blade instead of a 10ft long blade).

I would like to know if (and how) he bent those rails in the other direction.

I saw a list of related videos grouped with the rail bender. One was a fabricator from Poland. He has equipment that he makes, all heavy duty and all old school (no CNC). Lots of stuff, a wheel widening machine, all kinds of hydraulic stuff, you name it. Here is one

 

rtj

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I would like to know if (and how) he bent those rails in the other direction.


I was thinking the same thing, but after one or two bends he flips 180. If you mean in the narrow direction (tube long side vertical) I figured a hot rod frame may not need it or he changes the die and flips the mandrel.


The polish guy does make heavy duty stuff (video posted above). Some of these guys must have access to scraps as material prices are so darn high.
 
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rtj

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Powered hacksaws are rarely used because they eat blades. When everyone started going to bandsaws, those machines were really, really cheap to buy. You can still buy 'rebuilders' and even new. The problem is they get warm and that dulls the blade, once the blade gets dull it just creates a lot of heat.
Makes sense, I’ve seen them over the years and they always seemed to be relics seldom used.
 

BBShark

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I just found out the guy from Cornfield Customs is about 15 miles from me (Cincinnati area). He is a vintage tool collector, especially machines made in Cincinnati. Here is a Youtube vid of a line shaft power hammer he salvaged from an old building.

 
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SuperBuickGuy

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I just found out the guy from Cornfield Customs is about 15 miles from me (Cincinnati area). He is a vintage tool collector, especially machines made in Cincinnati. Here is a Youtube vid of a line shaft power hammer he salvaged from an old building.


as most know, my dad owns a company that builds stainless steel kitchen equipment. He had a Pullmax that I told him I wanted.... he sold it to someone else..... still salty about that.

for those who don't know - Pullmax is made in Cincinnati. I wish I could go salvage toolsI see being scrapped on the East coast but in all reality, it'd cost more to bring them here than it would to simply buy it here.
 

rtj

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I saw this and was intrigued. I always see old race car chassis for sale, so ended up watching a lot of this build.



 
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