Bleeding an Internal Hydraulic Throwout Bearing

BBShark

Garage Monkey
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I have had this car on jackstands for a loooong time. Yesterday I was finally ready to put it on the ground and drive it out of the garage. So, I started the car, pushed the clutch and tried to put it in reverse. Major grinding noise!

I have a TKO trans with a Mcleod hydraulic throwout bearing. Last year I bled the line by bleeding the master first, then the assembled system. I did it like I do brakes. Crack the bleeder, push the pedal down, tighten then raise the pedal. Repeat until there is no air.

I'm thinking this is not the same as brakes. The cylinder extends but brakes don't really extend. So you can't really pump a cylinder like you can pump brakes.
 

Twin_Turbo

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No its not the same. The easiest way is to bleed the clutch master seperately. The hydro is easiest bled off the car but can be done in if you hook a long bleeder line to it. The bleed should come out on top of the hydro. Just push fluid through the bottom line or suck via the top. Off the car I submerge both lines in a can and work the piston. Does it come with a dry brake like on t56 tr6060 etc?
 

BBShark

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Marck, I bench bled the MC but the hydraulic bearing was dry. The bearing is a Mcleod 1300 series and I have seen a bunch of different instructions of how to bleed it. Mcleod has a YT vid showing how and this is what I did:



Not really sure I understand how this is working when the guy pushes the pedal fast and no bubbles when pushing slow?
 

Twin_Turbo

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Thats how I do it when in the car. Theres bubbles when pushing slow abd fast, the slow is to get the thing partialky filled and oumping ut fast will pull the last remaining bubbles with it
 

BBShark

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I tried the method were you pump the clutch with the bleeder submerged in the fluid. It was pretty messy, my line was too short and I didn't have a third hand to do this. I looked around and found a way to do it which was a basically an on the car, bench bleed process. I greased the threads of the bleeder, attached a tube to the bleeder, put the other end of the tube in the reservoir submerged in fluid. Then went through a normal open bleeder, push pedal to floor, close bleeder, then the pedal up. Worked great!
 
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