Amazing Metalwork - XKE Restomod - Update 11/23/22

BBShark

Garage Monkey
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Door Skins

Chuck from Monocoque Metal Works says E-type doors are the bane of his existence. Fitting them to the body shell and getting the gaps correct can be quite a challenge.
When it came time to installing my after market door skins on my repaired door shells, I could see something wasn't correct on the right side. After conducting a survey of the two, I found the one skin had the crease line stamped 1/4" lower than the other. My supplier in the States graciously offered to do an exchange, but considering shipping costs, I elected to hammer form a higher crease line to match the shell and the other skin.

Two door skins:
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Measurement discrepancy, 2 5/8" VS 2 7/8"
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Shells siting on skins:
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End view showing mismatch:
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Had to shrink and stretch skin in various places:
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Primed, painted and applied sound deadener at this time:
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Installing skin, folded over edge with hammer and dolly:
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BBShark

Garage Monkey
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Setting Door Gaps

Apparently, when these cars were made in England, as the car body went down the assembly line, they would have a row of completed doors available, and would choose one that best fit the car in front of them. After mounting the door, they would lead in the body to fit the door.

Well, not in my case. Here it was a matter mostly of making the door fit the opening and doing some modifications to the body shell where needed.

With a good reliable door hinge, I was looking for a 1/8" to 3/16" door gap. With the doors mounted, there was very little length where I needed it. Adding or removing metal would fix it.

The left side bulkhead between the bonnet and the door was sitting proud of the door by more than 1/8". This could have been compensated for by adding filler to the door but that is never a good option. I opted to cut and section that area to bring it in line.

- first, remove the factory lead in the seam.
- second, cut and slice
- third, weld back together
- fourth, grind weld
1669203154051.png

The upper front section of the E-type door has never appealed to me. The weather seal often doesn't sit right and a crisp, clean door gap is seldom achieved. I'm taking a chance on improving this.

- photo of red car shows weather seal mismatch
- set 1/8" rod in place
- weld rod to body
- finished door gap to 1/8"
1669203224825.png

The gap at the bottom of both doors was too small. I took it to 1/8" by cutting back a 2" length, welding and grinding then moving ahead another 2". My pace ended up at 6"/ hour.

Example of one 2" length:
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Finished door gap:
1669203347995.png
 

BBShark

Garage Monkey
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Door Window Frame

Fitting the window frame into the door shell is a matter of making it fit the best you can in the space you’re given. Much like getting the door shell to work with the hinges and latch mechanism, the door frame must work with what it comes in contact with. A lot of variance of fit can be taken up with the door seal that this car comes with, except for one area and that is the contact between the rear edge of the window frame to the ¼ window or rear side glass window. This is a double seal that requires a gap tolerance of 1/16”.

Keeping these two windows in that relationship really limits how much you can move things around.

The ¼ window attaches to a B post that mounts with a limited amount of adjustability, top and bottom.

Using the rebuilt door shells and new door skins, I set about to try and make the window frame fit in the space with the correct gap to the ¼ window. It took a lot of study but I came to the conclusion that the mounting screws for the B post were never installed correctly from the factory to allow for a correct gap. This is especially critical since with the window being 24” long, a small angle changes the window position a lot. I knocked out the captive nuts and enlarged the two holes enough to move the B post to where I needed it. If it never fit properly before, it’s going to fit properly now.

Laid out, window frame and ¼ window relationship:
1669203617342.png

-¼ window installed
-lower mount
-enlarged holes
-B post seal
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Installed correctly:
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