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  #371  
Old 07-24-2018, 10:21 PM
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the Porsche GT_ cars had a Lithium battery option... I would have to imagine of all batteries those would be the least likely to cause fire? They pop up for sale once in a while... $$$
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  #372  
Old 08-12-2018, 09:28 PM
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Going to swap out the intake manifold next week. I'm currently running an old Edelbrock C396 manifold (for the stock/sleeper look), but I've got a spare that had been gathering dust over the years. Several guys over at the Chevelle website (where there's still a large group who run these antique BB engines) have had good results bumping up their higher RPM power by removing the plenum divider from their intake manifolds. I've got more bottom end power in the engine than I can use, so I spent some time with a carbide grinding wheel and removed the divider, and then noticed a few other bits of casting on the manifold that wasn't doing any productive work (the exhaust crossover under the plenum was the biggest chunk). I got about 1.5-2 pounds of aluminum ground off the manifold so far, but will end up putting a couple ounces back on when I weld up the center crossover ports on the gasket flange.

Last fall I replaced the trouble-prone/demon-possessed Holley 850 with one of the newer aluminum body models. This carb is about 4 pounds lighter.

Not a lot of weight removed, but it's from up front and up high.
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  #373  
Old 08-14-2018, 01:12 AM
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Nice! 1-2lbs that high up and forward is pretty significant in my book... And it was free? Cant beat that! That might have a similar loss to 3-4 lbs dead center and under the car.

Is there a term for that? "dynamic weight loss" maybe? Weight further from points of rotation that has more of an effect compared to weight that is closer to the point of rotation?
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  #374  
Old 08-15-2018, 03:13 AM
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Originally Posted by vette427sbc View Post
Nice! 1-2lbs that high up and forward is pretty significant in my book... And it was free? Cant beat that! That might have a similar loss to 3-4 lbs dead center and under the car.

Is there a term for that? "dynamic weight loss" maybe? Weight further from points of rotation that has more of an effect compared to weight that is closer to the point of rotation?
The geek in me often envisions different moment arms (or leverage arms) and rotational axes in the car. The couple pounds I got off the intake manifold reduces (albeit in a smaller quantity than I wish) the nose dive effect under braking, and the roll effect during cornering. It's certainly not much, but it's directionally correct.

Your comment reminds me of an additional bit of "reward" for spending the time making the aluminum mufflers last year. The mufflers are located at the extreme rear of the car (great, if I drag raced the car, but I don't) which causes two detriments to handling. The extreme rearward weighting will induce oversteer (bad, of course), but the placement of that weight, due to the moment arm using the rear axle as the pivot, tries to lift the front wheels off the ground, causing understeer. It's a lose-lose situation. By making the lighter weight mufflers I (theoretically) reduced both the oversteer and the understeer, a win-win situation (plus acceleration and deceleration is improved due to the lower total vehicle mass).

(A few years back I made a muffler and packaged it under the passenger seat floor area, in an effort to reduce system weight and centralize the mass of the muffler closer to the car's cg/rotational axis. It worked fine on the track, but the loss of precious ground clearance during street driving just made life difficult, so I went back to the stock location for the mufflers, but reduced the weight as much as I could while still keeping the exhaust pretty quiet.)
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  #375  
Old 08-15-2018, 12:21 PM
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Make yourself some NASCAR boom tubes. There are some good articles on these.

1-7/8″ High
8-1/2″ Wide
30″ Long

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  #376  
Old 08-21-2018, 04:16 PM
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Make yourself some NASCAR boom tubes. There are some good articles on these.

1-7/8″ High
8-1/2″ Wide
30″ Long

[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]
That's something to mull over. Two things I'd have to work out. A while back I had a similar size item under the passenger seat floor (an exhaust termination box), and the loud booming noise from the flat upper surface just penetrated the cabin. I'd have to figure out a way to dampen the noise transfer from the flat surface, and I'd have to make it out of aluminum for weight reasons.
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  #377  
Old 08-21-2018, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by redvetracr View Post
how about a polycarbonate front windshield, fiberglass bumpers, lightweight hood & t-tops, triple disc clutch w/reverse drive starter (not only lighter but lowers your moment of inertia), EDM lighten your ring gear...have I spent enough of your money yet?
Lots of good ideas there. My wallet may end up the lightest item in the list.
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  #378  
Old 08-21-2018, 04:38 PM
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Default Trying for a few ounces off the water pump.

I've got a old frozen bearing ZL1 aluminum water pump sitting on the shelf waiting for a rebuild, and I noticed how heavy the steel rear/impeller cover is (13.5 ounces). If I get bored some evening I think I'll cut a cover out of aluminum and see what weight I can trim off there. There's not a helluva lot of room ahead of the timing cover, so I'll have to see what thickness aluminum I can even sneak in there.

Again (if it works), it's not much, but it's up front on the car.

Edit1: I put the water pump on my old original engine sitting on my run stand. Looks like there's about 5/16 inch of usable space between the timing chain cover and the pump cover flange. However, if I use any cover material thicker than about an eighth inch I might not have room for the bolt heads unless I countersink them. Doing a bit of math on the cover area and thickness (giving me the volume of the cover material), I could figure out the weight of a new cover. A 3/16" thick cover would be five ounces lighter (directionally correct), and an eighth inch thick cover would be eight ounces lighter (hot damn, half a pound). For the first round I think I'll make and install an eighth inch cover for the broken pump, fill it with water, and then plumb the pump up to about 15-20# of air pressure to test/confirm the (burst) strength of the cover. Beforehand I'll try to find some material strength numbers and do some calculations, just to get a better warm and fuzzy feeling about this modification (and the pressure test!).

Edit2: After giving the issue a bit of thought I'm suspecting I'm being a bit too "worried". I got to thinking about the thinner material thickness of the expansion tank and the typical radiator. I gotta think that an eighth inch thick cover should be just fine. (I think I'll still do the pressure test anyway, just for amusement.)

Last edited by 69427; 08-21-2018 at 08:45 PM.. Reason: Adding content. Again.
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  #379  
Old 08-21-2018, 07:48 PM
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Based on your comments, I may take a swipe at making aluminum side pipe mufflers. Iíve been thinking about doing them in steel, but found cheap intercooler alum. tubing last month. It might make good SP muffler material.

Wasnít your car a 6 pack originally?
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  #380  
Old 08-21-2018, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by rtj View Post
Based on your comments, I may take a swipe at making aluminum side pipe mufflers. Iíve been thinking about doing them in steel, but found cheap intercooler alum. tubing last month. It might make good SP muffler material.

Wasnít your car a 6 pack originally?
No, just a lowly 390 horse Quadrajet model.
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